Languages

Languages of India
"Whenever ideas fail, men invent words" as stated simply by Martin H. Fischer is reality in India which is a terrain for multiple lingos'. Each language shares a communal language and philosophy. The prime official language of India is Hindi, while English gets the secondary treatment. Though, there are thousands of dialects that increase the intensity in the country but only 18 languages are formally accepted in India by the constitution.
Each language shares a communal language and philosophy. The prime official language of India is Hindi, while English gets the secondary treatment. Though, there are thousands of dialects that increase the intensity in the country but only 18 languages are formally accepted in India by the constitution.

The languages of India originate from four historic families, viz. Indo-European languages (spoken by 75% of Indians) and the Dravidian languages (spoken by 23% of Indians) and remaining 2% of the population speaks Mon-Khmer languages and Sino Tibetan languages. These linguistic families split India physically as well.

Geographically, Indo-European languages are being spoken in the northern and central India whereas in southern part of India; the languages of Dravidian civilization are articulated. In eastern part of India language of Mon-Khmer culture is accepted. Sino Tibetan languages are articulated in the northern part of Himalayas and near to Burmese boundary.

As per the constitution of India, "The official language of the Union shall be Hindi in Devnagri script. Neither the Constitution of India nor Indian law specifies a national language, a position supported by a High Court ruling. Although, languages scheduled in the Eighth Schedule of the Indian constitution are at times referred to, without legal standing, as the national languages of India".

Hindi is the major lingo of around 40 per cent of the India's population. Therefore, it has been made the India's official language in the year 1965. However, no language can state spokespersons' with even 10 per cent of Indian population, other than Hindi. Many Indian citizens are multi-linguistic and can speak in more than one language, chiefly individuals living in cities or share the state borders.

The range of languages spoken in India quite dispersed. For instance, Hindi is being spoken by over 250 million speakers, whereas Andamanese is spoken by comparatively fewer populaces.

Population speaking Tribal language in India can be higher than few of the European languages. For example, the two tribal languages Bhili and Santali individually have around 4 million speakers. In fact, it is vivid to see that, schools in India imparts training in more than 50 distinct languages; there are Films being produced in 15 varied languages, Newspaper Bulletins in 90 or more languages and radio programmes been aired in 71 languages!